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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
, fewer than in october. the blame for last month's slowdown in hiring falls squarely on hurricane sandy, not on any new or widespread weakness in the economy. >> i would expect that by december, we're going to see some bounce back. much of the disruption from sandy was people simply not being able to get to work or firms not employing people that they ordinarily would have. >> reporter: friday, the government will report it's monthly snapshot of the u.s. labor market. it, too, is likely to reflect temporary effects related to the aftermath of hurricane sandy. >> we're looking for only a 50,000 gain in jobs in november, well under that 170,000 average we've seen over the past three months. >> reporter: hurricane sandy's effects on hiring may be short- lived, but experts worry fiscal cliff concerns could result in a new storm brewing for workers looking to land a job in the coming weeks. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: citi and the financials lead the way higher on wall street, helping the dow top 13,000 again. but a big drop in apple shares kept the nasdaq from gains. by the c
automakers got a bump up in sales in november, thanks to super storm sandy. consumers postponed purchases when the hurricane hit in october, and resumed buying last month. but as diane eastabrook reports, the looming fiscal cliff could cause that sales momentum to lose traction. >> reporter: november turned out to be a good month for the big three and a great month for their foreign competitors. g.m. and ford both saw a modest uptick in vehicle sales last month-- while chrysler got a double digit boost. but competitors from europe and japan blew the domestics doors off. sales at v.w. were up just under 30%. while honda led the japanese pack with a sales increase of just under 40%. the car companies think super storm sandy pushed some sales the last weekend of october into november. morningstar auto analyst richard hilgert agrees sandy helped, but the storm wasn't the primary reason november was such a strong month. >> we've got a lot of pent up demand still out there-- pent up demand coming from, especially from the average age of the vehicles being over eleven years at this point in the
will that affect the outlook for next year. we'll ask b.m.o asset management's sandy lincoln. he's this week's "market monitor" guest. and why a new program to help student loan borrowers could mean a big win for high earners with graduate degrees. >> its medical marijuana business is a $2 billion a year industry already. it's projected to more than quad are you nell the next four years. but now colorado and washington state residents can use marijuana without a doctor's permission. while they are still breaking federal law, what impact could these new state laws have on the medical dope business? we have more of our recent conversation with tripp keber, c.e.o. of medical marijuana products maker dixie elixirs. >> you are looking at a $300 million in denver going to in excess of $600 million, this is about taxes, this is about jobs. the state of colorado we paid into a state coffers as an industry over $50 million in taxes, licenses and fees. we employ as an industry directly over 10,000 people in the state. and so there are not many states that can afford to turn a blind eye to that. so i c
institute estimates insured losses from sandy will likely run around $19 billion, making it the third costliest natural disaster behind katrina and andrew. >> the cost of living is higher, houses are more expensive, so that's going to inflate our costs all the way around. >> reporter: insured losses are just one part of the equation. uninsured losses will likely run into the tens of billions of dollars. jim beukholt's is the third generation owner of the ben franklin shop. >> we didn't have flood insurance, so we have to take a loss on everything. >> reporter: sandra gerber's vacation home didn't have any flood insurance, either. nearly two feet of water means her recently remodeled home will have to be gutted. >> i don't have flood insurance. i don't have hurricane insurance. i just have the normal fire, theft liability. >> reporter: but with the high cost to rebuild, where everything from sheet rock to lumber are more expensive, residents worry that two big storms in two years will cause insurance premiums to rise and property values to decline. ruben ramirez, nbr, lavallette, new j
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)